Buddhism, Critical Concepts in Religious Studies, Volume 1

Paul Williams

Language: English

Pages: 336

ISBN: 2:00304398

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


From a field primarily of interest to specialist orientalists, the study of Buddhism has developed to embrace inter alia, theology and religious studies, philosophy, cultural studies, anthropology and comparative studies. There is now greater direct access to Buddhism in the West than ever before, and Buddhist studies are attracting increasing numbers of students.

This eight-volume set brings together seminal papers in Buddhist studies from a vast range of academic disciplines, published over the last forty years. With a new introduction by the editor, this collection is a unique and unrivalled research resource for both student and scholar.

VOLUME I BUDDHIST ORIGINS AND THE EARLY
HISTORY OF BUDDHISM IN SOUTH AND
SOUTHEAST ASIA
Acknowledgements XVI
Chronological table of reprinted articles and chapters x1x
General introduction xxix
1 La construction et le culte des stiipa d'apres les Vinayapi{aka 1
ANDRE BAREAU
2 Asoka and Buddhism - a re-examination
A.L. BASHAM
3 The date of the Buddha reconsidered
HEINZ BECHERT
4 On the very idea of the Pali Canon
STEVEN COLLINS
5 Pali oral literature
L.S. COUSINS
6 The dating of the historical Buddha: a review article
L.S. COUSINS
7 Recovering the Buddha's message
R.F. GOMBRICH
8 The Buddha's Book of Genesis? 129
RICHARD GOMBRICH
9 Assisting the dead by venerating the living: merit transfer in
the early Buddhist tradition 147
JOHN C. HOLT
10 Playing with fire: the prafityasamutpiida from the perspective
of Vedic thought 169
JOANNA JUREWICZ
11 The assessment of textual authenticity in Buddhism 188
ETIENNE LAMOTTE
12 The assessment of textual interpretation in Buddhism 199
ETIENNE LAMOTTE
13 Religious suicide in early Buddhism 214
ETIENNE LAMOTTE
14 A review of scholarship on the Buddhist Councils 224
CHARLES S. PREBISH
15 Theories concerning the Skandhaka: an appraisal 244
CHARLES S. PREBISH
16 The Pratimok~a puzzle: fact versus fantasy 257
CHARLES S. PREBISH
17 Nuns, laywomen, donors, goddesses: female roles in early
Indian Buddhism 272

Confusion No More: For the Spiritual Seeker

Introducing Buddha: A Graphic Guide

Going to Pieces without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness

Buddha Standard Time: Awakening to the Infinite Possibilities of Now

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(satpuru!ja) ordinaire (prthagjana), sur le sommet horizontal, il ne peut y avoir de parasol a roue (lt :li) » [T. 1451, p. 291 c]. Et plus loin:« ... les roues (:$8) [sont] au nombre de un, deux, trois ou quatre selon 8 LE CULTE DES STOPA D'APRES LES V!NAYAPITAKA le Fruit (phala), il faut le savoir. Pour les hommes vertueux ordinaires, le sommet est plat en: lifO comme pour un caitya (1M !.it). Si !'on construit un caitya pour le Buddha, les parasols a roue sont en nombre indetermine et

(Dharmaguptaka) [le detail du laboureur revient plus loin chez ces demiers, mais ce n'est pas un brahmane; il est difficile de choisir entre les deux versions sur ce point, bien que le detail « brahmane » leur soit commun; Nagaraviddha, Nagaravidha et Nagaraputra doivent etre identifies a Nagarabindu/ Nagaravinda qui etait un village de brahmanes situe entre Sravastl, capitale du Kosala, et Varal)asl]. Le Buddha sourit. Les moines (Mahasanghika) ou Ananda (Mahlsasaka et Dharmaguptaka) [precision

prescriptions analogue a celle de Ia version precedente. Chaque paragraphe est precede d'une stance (giitha) qui en resume le contenu. Les deux versions de ce recit tres simple ne different guere que par deux details : chez les Sarvastivadin, le lieu de l'entrevue est passe sous silence, mais facile a deviner puisque Ie donateur est bien connu pour habiter Sravastl; Ies Mulasarvastivadin taisent Ia raison pour laquelle est construit le stiipa. Cette seconde version parait plus tardive que

mythology, theology, etc., concerning various great gods such as Vi~l)u and Siva; they include also, amongst others, a little-studied genre of regional, caste purtivas, about which Ludo Rocher says, in his recent book on the subject (1986, p. 72): Even though this type of texts relate to single castes in limited areas of the subcontinent, they are again not fundamentally different from pural)ic literature generally ... [then, quoting another writer:] The caste-puriil)as may be considered to be

generations, it may upset people; but we should learn from the Buddha that in no area of life is reality inherently pleasant. For the most part, the interpretation of the Pali canon which has been accepted by the Theravadin tradition has been that embodied in the Pali commentaries. When these were written down, which traditionally is said to have happened late in the first century BCE3 and is unlikely to have been earlier, they certainly represented an oral tradition of exegesis which in some

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