Buddhism, Critical Concepts in Religious Studies, Volume 8

Paul Williams

Language: English

Pages: 458

ISBN: 2:00304405

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


From a field primarily of interest to specialist orientalists, the study of Buddhism has developed to embrace inter alia, theology and religious studies, philosophy, cultural studies, anthropology and comparative studies. There is now greater direct access to Buddhism in the West than ever before, and Buddhist studies are attracting increasing numbers of students.

This eight-volume set brings together seminal papers in Buddhist studies from a vast range of academic disciplines, published over the last forty years. With a new introduction by the editor, this collection is a unique and unrivalled research resource for both student and scholar.

VOLUME VIII BUDDHISM IN CHINA, EAST ASIA AND
JAPAN
Acknowledgements
97 Did 1-ching go to India? Problems in using 1-ching as a
source on South Asian Buddhism
T.H. BARRETT
98 Stiipa, siitra and sarira in China, c.656-706 CE
T.H. BARRETT
99 The life of Shinran Shonin: the journey to self-acceptance
ALFRED BLOOM
100 Cliches canoniques bouddhiques dans les legendes sur les
debuts du bouddhisme au Japon
HUBERT DURT
101 Two Interpretations of human-flesh offering: misdeed or
supreme sacrifice
HUBERT DURT
102 Flying mountains and walkers of emptiness: toward a
definition of sacred space in Japanese religions
ALLAN G. GRAPARD
103 The place of the sudden teaching within the Hua-yen
tradition: an investigation of the process of doctrinal change 161
PETER N. GREGORY
104 On the concept of the hijiri (holy man)
ICHIRO HORI
105 Buddhist self-immolation in medieval China
YUN-HUA JAN
106 The development of the kenmitsu system as Japan's
medieval orthodoxy
TOSHIO KURODA
107 The dragon girl and the abbess of Mo-shan: gender and
status in the Ch'an Buddhist tradition
MIRIAM L. LEVERING
108 Historical and historiographical issues in the study of
pre-modern Japanese religions
NEIL McMULLIN
109 The idolization of enlightenment: on the mummification of
Ch'an masters in medieval China
ROBERT H. SHARF
110 Buddhist influence on early Taoism: a survey of scriptural
evidence 367
ERIK ZURCHER

The Lotus Sutra: A Contemporary Translation of a Buddhist Classic

Women of the Way: Discovering 2,500 Years of Buddhist Wisdom

Peace Is Every Step: The Path of Mindfulness in Everyday Life

The Heart Sutra Explained: Indian and Tibetan Commentaries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BUDDHISM Critical Concepts in Religious Studies Edited by Paul Williams Volume VIII Buddhism in China, East Asia, and Japan ~~ ~~o~~~;n~~~up LONDON AND NEW YORK First published 2005 by Routledge 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OXI4 4RN Simultaneously published in the USA and Canada by Routledge 270 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10016 Routledge is an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group Editorial material and selection © 2005 Paul Williams; individual owners retain copyright in

published an excellent account of how his tale stands up as a mediaeval document3, but in what follows the similarities and differences between 1-ching and Marco may perhaps be kept in mind. BUDDHISM IN CHINA, EAST ASIA AND JAPAN For Chinese travellers to India certainly brought their own cultural attitudes with them, affecting not simply their outlook on what they saw, but also their very modes of expression, which must always be read against Chinese conventions if they are not to mislead us

Korean peninsula as being of Chinese origin, but nothing of particular relevance to the empress appears to be contained in them, and unfortunately no documentary sources now survive from the seventh or eighth centuries that might provide more useful information85 • The best that can be said is that Chinese diplomatic records for 681 and 693 detail contacts that could have allowed for a transfer of relics to the newly unified Korea to have taken place 86 • Equally there is nothing to show in this

the tenth century Qian Shu (929-988), the ruler of the small but prosperous state ofWu-Yue, with territory around the mouth of the Yangtse river, seems to have followed a dynastic policy of strong ideological support for religion, and Buddhism in particular, in order to promote its image in the interstate diplomacy of the period 144 . In particular there is plenty of surviving evidence to show that he engaged over a number of years in the Asokan distribution of relics in textual form, using a

York: Oxford University Press, 1943), pp. 85-86. E.g. K. R. Norman, A Philological Approach to Buddhism (London: SOAS, 1997), pp. 41-57 (and cf. 77-94); R. Gombrich, 'How the Mahayana began', in T. Skorupski, ed., The Buddhist Forum, I (London: SOAS, 1990), pp. 21-30. Su Bai, Tang-Song shiqi de diaoban yinshua (Beijing: Wenwu chubanshe, 1999), pp. 7-9, gives the most convenient summary of these materials I have seen recently. For some of my doubts over dating (which may perhaps now be set aside),

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